Citizen Science Trips

2018 CITIZEN SCIENCE AND RESTORATION TRIPS 


Join us for a trip to the beautiful Gifford Pinchot National Forest to help improve wildlife habitat and collect important data about the streams, roads, and trees of Washington’s South Cascades. No prior experience necessary! For most trips, we will be meeting near the project sites in the national forest at 10:00 am and wrapping up around 4:00 pm. For overnight trips, we will be camping at a nearby campground or lodging in town near the project areas (depending on the season and trip logistics). Attending for one day of a two or three-day trip can often be accommodated. Be sure to note that preference when you register. We supply all necessary survey and restoration equipment for trips. What you need to bring: water, lunch (and dinner/breakfast on multiple-day trips), rain gear, waterproof hiking boots and/or rain boots, sunscreen, and anything else you might need while out in the woods.
April 19 (Thurs): Citizen science info session

April 19th (6-8pm): Citizen science info session for volunteer-led trip – Want to volunteer with CFC but can’t make it on any of our trips or want to do some citizen science exploration on your own? Come join us at Laurelwood Brew Pub (NE Sandy) to find out how to be an independent citizen scientist. The projects include: pika surveys to locate current populations, beaver habitat surveys to find optimal release locations for beavers, and wildlife camera surveys to observe the distribution of the many carnivores within GPNF. This info session will provide you with everything you need to know about the data collection for these projects, including where to go, what to look for, and how to report your findings!  Please register your attendance on the trip signup form, so we know how many people to expect.

April 21 (Sat): Riparian planting

April 21st (Sat): Riparian planting – In partnership with the US Forest Service, CFC is continuing to embark on riparian restoration throughout the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. Last year, with the help of volunteers, we planted over 1,500 cottonwoods, willows and Douglas-firs along multiple degraded and at-risk waterways to help us increase stream shade, improve bank stability, and enhance biodiversity. Join us for our first riparian planting trip of the season restoring riparian vegetation along beautiful creeks and wetlands that support vulnerable salmonid, amphibian, and avian populations. Planting trips entail a full day of physical labor, sometimes hiking through uneven terrain with heavy gear or planting bags. Trip difficulty rating: 5 out of 5

April 28-29 (Sat-Sun): Riparian planting

April 28th-29th (Sat-Sun): Riparian planting –  For this trip, we will be heading to stream reaches in the north part of Gifford Pinchot National Forest to plant native trees along at-risk waterways in an effort to improve aquatic health and fish habitat by increasing stream shade, strengthening bank stability, and enhancing biodiversity. We’ll be meeting in Randle, WA at 10:00 on Saturday morning, staying at a lodging facility in Packwood, WA on Saturday evening, and heading back out to the planting locations early Sunday morning. The trip will wrap up mid-afternoon on Sunday. Planting trips entail a full day of physical labor, sometimes hiking through uneven terrain with heavy gear or planting bags. Trip difficulty rating: 5 out of 5

June 23 (Sat): Beaver habitat survey

June 23 (Sat): Beaver habitat survey – Over the next two years, we’ll be reintroducing beavers into strategic locations of the southern Washington Cascades to improve aquatic habitat and resilience. Working from our recently completed spatial analysis, we’ll be touring riparian areas throughout the forest to identify a set of optimal release sites. Surveying these sites will entail looking for past or present beaver structures, measuring stream width, and analyzing various environmental features. On this trip, we’ll be meeting in the south part of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest and breaking up into small groups to explore tributaries around Wind River and Panther Creek. These trips entail hiking through uneven terrain, along riparian areas, and sometimes across streams. Trip difficulty rating: 4 out of 5

June 29-July 1 (Fri-Sun): Beaver habitat survey

June 29-July 1 (Fri-Sun): Beaver habitat survey – Over the next two years, we’ll be reintroducing beavers into strategic locations of the southern Washington Cascades to improve aquatic habitat and resilience. Working from our recently completed spatial analysis, we’ll be touring riparian areas throughout the forest to identify a set of optimal release sites. Surveying these sites will entail looking for past or present beaver structures, measuring stream width, and analyzing various environmental features. On this three-day trip, we’ll be meeting in the north zone of the Gifford Pinchot on Friday morning, going over project specifics, and then breaking up into small groups to explore riparian reaches around the Cowlitz and Cispus River. These trips entail hiking through uneven terrain, along riparian areas, and sometimes across streams. Trip difficulty rating: 4 out of 5

July 30-31 (Mon-Tues): Huckleberry survey

July 30-31 (Mon-Tues): Huckleberry survey – Through our involvement with the Pinchot Partners forest collaborative, we’ll be leading a survey of huckleberry restoration sites to determine the effects of forest thinning on huckleberry restoration. On this trip, we’ll be visiting areas just north of Indian Heaven Wilderness that were thinned to promote huckleberry growth. We’ll be camping nearby the survey sites. The terrain on huckleberry surveys can be steep can contain a large number of downed logs so navigation may be difficult in certain areas. And, some units are in exposed locations so sun protection is needed. Trip difficulty rating: 3 out of 5

Aug 3-5 (Fri-Sun): Huckleberry survey

Aug 3-5 (Fri-Sun): Huckleberry survey – Through our involvement with the Pinchot Partners forest collaborative, we’ll be leading a survey of huckleberry restoration sites to determine the effects of forest thinning on huckleberry restoration. This three-day, two-night camping trip will explore huckleberry treatment areas near Pinto Rock and the Windy Ridge Lookout east of Mount St. Helens. If you’d like to join for just one or two days, note that when you register and we can likely make arrangements accordingly. The terrain on huckleberry surveys can be steep can contain a large number of downed logs so navigation may be difficult in certain areas. And, some units are in exposed locations so sun protection is needed. Trip difficulty rating: 3 out of 5

Aug 11-12 (Sat-Sun): Mount St. Helens mine hike

August 11-12 (Sat-Sun): Goat Mountain camp and hike – Visit the remote Green River valley which is threatened by a hardrock mining proposal. On this trip, we provide updates on the project and hike part of the Goat Mountain trail. Trip difficulty rating: 2 out of 5

Aug 24-26 (Fri-Sun): Seed collection for post-fire project

Aug 24-26 (Fri-Sun): Seed collection for post-fire restoration – As part of a long-term effort to build ecosystem health and future resilience of habitats around Mount Adams, we’ll be collecting native seeds of forbs and grasses for future seeding and planting efforts in areas that were most severely impacted by uncharacteristically intense fires and fire cycles. Volunteers will be trained by Forest Service specialists on Friday morning and will be carrying out seed collection that day and the following. After a laid-back Sunday morning in the forests of Mount Adams, we’ll wrap up any loose ends with the seeds and head back to town mid-morning. We’ll be camping nearby the project areas. Trip difficulty rating: 2 out of 5

Aug 29 (Wed): Road survey

Aug 29 (Wed): Road survey – Tour remote forest roads near Wind River to collect important data on stream culverts, forest road conditions, erosion, and fish passage. This information is used to help us and the Forest Service prioritize road restoration efforts, such as repairing blocked culverts, fixing erosion issues, minimizing channels of sediment delivery to streams, or closing at-risk roads. For road surveys, we meet in the morning to go over project logistics and then break up into groups of four or five in order to visit a variety of roads in the project area. Road survey trips require walking long distances. Although some roads are rough, most are open roads with a gravel or dirt base. Measuring culverts does require traversing steep roadsides. Trip difficulty rating: 2 out of 5

Sept 14-15 (Fri. eve-Sat): Timber survey

Sept 15 (Fri. eve-Sat): Timber survey – Help us collect on-the-ground information for an upcoming timber sale. This work helps us understand the habitat values of the area and the ecological effects of management. We’ll be meeting Friday evening (or early Saturday morning if you want to head out early that morning) at a nearby campground and getting started Saturday morning surveying timber units. This trip will include off-trail hiking with uneven footing. Trip difficulty rating: 3 out of 5

Sept 28 (Fri): Off-road vehicle monitoring trip

Sept 28: (Fri): Off-road vehicle survey – Help us collect information about off-road vehicle impacts to roadless areas in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. Walking will mostly be on established trails in the Dark Divide near Craggy Peak, and may include some uneven footing and elevation gain. Trip difficulty rating: 3 out of 5

Oct. 27-28 (Sat-Sun): Riparian planting

Oct. 27-28 (Sat-Sun): Riparian planting – For this two-day trip, we will be heading to stream reaches in the central part of Gifford Pinchot National Forest to plant native trees along at-risk waterways in an effort to improve aquatic health and fish habitat by increasing stream shade, strengthening bank stability, and enhancing biodiversity. We’ll be meeting near Cougar, WA on Saturday morning and heading out to the riparian planting areas after a short orientation. Depending on the weather, we’ll be camping or lodging near the Swift Reservoir on Saturday evening and heading back out to new planting sites on Sunday morning. We’ll wrap up mid-afternoon on Sunday. Trip difficulty rating: 5 out of 5

Nov 2-4 (Fri. eve-Sun): Riparian planting

Nov 2-4 (Fri. eve.-Sun): Riparian planting – THIS TRIP IS FULL. For this three-day trip, we will be heading to stream reaches in the north part of Gifford Pinchot National Forest to plant native trees along at-risk waterways in an effort to improve aquatic health and fish habitat by increasing stream shade, strengthening bank stability, and enhancing biodiversity. We’ll be meeting in Packwood, WA on Friday evening, staying at a lodging facility in town both nights, and heading off to planting areas around the Cispus River on Saturday and Sunday. The trip will wrap up mid-afternoon on Sunday. Trip difficulty rating: 5 out of 5

TripSignUp (3)

Trip Signup Form

    We will send all registered participants a confirmation email four weeks before the trip (or an email before this time letting you know you are on the waitlist). We will send out all the trip details, meeting information, and carpool options one to two weeks before the trip. You will be notified by email if a trip is canceled due to particularly heavy rain or inclement weather.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.


INDEPENDENT VOLUNTEER ADVENTURES

Do you want to visit the Gifford Pinchot National Forest on a mission? There are a variety of survey needs that can be tackled independently by citizen stewards. You can head out for a survey trip with friends or family or tie it into a weekend camping trip. The projects this year that can benefit from independent volunteers include beaver habitat surveys and pika surveys. You’ll need a little training and information to get started, so get in touch and fill out the trip signup form (be sure to indicate that you’d like to learn more about the independent volunteer trips).

In addition, we are looking for a group of individuals who would like to be one of our four wildlife camera survey teams. Ideally, this is a group of four to six people that are interested in heading out to the forest every two weeks for wildlife camera surveys throughout the summer and fall. Generally, two to three people would go on each trip, and due to schedules, it is good to have a larger group on-board for the effort. Let us know if you have a team in mind and ready to go and we’ll set up a time to meet.

 


JOIN US IN THE OFFICE!

Are you interested in learning how the office is run at an environmental nonprofit? Look no further — We need computer-savvy individuals to help with data entry, Salesforce assistance, and other office maintenance. Have some IT expertise to share? We’d love to talk to you! This is a great learning (or teaching) opportunity for passionate environmentalists!

Send us an email at info@cascadeforest.org