Wild & Scenic Film Festival

Join us for a night of inspiring stories about adventure, nature and conservation! On Thursday, April 30, 2020, Cascade Forest Conservancy will be a hosting a screening of films from the Wild & Scenic Film Festival. Outdoor adventure and conservation are at the heart of the eight films we are showing. CFC is very excited to be holding this event at the Kiggins Theater, Vancouver’s historic cinema in the heart of downtown. Check back soon for synopses of the films in our 2020 program.

Tickets: $15 in advance, $20 at the door (if available); use the form on the right.

Proceeds from this event go to the Cascade Forest Conservancy. We will also be holding a raffle with fun outdoor prizes! Your attendance and support make our conservation, education and advocacy programs in the heart of the Cascades possible. Read more about our work.

When: Thursday, April 30, 2020. Doors open at 6:45, program starts at 7:30.

Where: Kiggins Theater, 1011 Main St, Vancouver, WA 98660

Synopses of films from 2019 screening (2020 program will be available soon):

"Blue"

Fresh off training wheels, a four-year-old growing up in Valdez, Alaska begins to push her boundaries and explore what’s possible on her
bike, her eyes naturally drifting to the mountains. We dive into the world of her fantasy and explore the mountains, glaciers, and rivers
of Valdez by fat bike with a crew of boundary-pushing female athletes hailing from Alaska and beyond. Blue is a fantastical journey into
a young girl’s imagination and a testament to the inherent creativity, innovation, and strength forged in women of the north.

Climbing out of Disaster

In the immediate aftermath of Puerto Rico’s Hurricane Maria, a group of local climbers bands together to use their skills and knowledge
for the greater good of the community.

My Mom Vala

Life has a way of putting us where we need to be. For Vala, that’s in both Greenland – where she works at her family’s fishing lodge –
and Reykjavík, where she teaches her daughter how to do it all on her own, too.

Flipping the Switch

LeeAnne Walters led a citizens’ movement that tested the tap water in Flint, Michigan, and exposed the Flint water crisis. The results
showed that one in six homes had lead levels in water that exceeded the EPA’s safety threshold. Walters’ persistence compelled the
local, state, and federal governments to take action and ensure that residents of Flint have access to clean water. Narrated by Robert
Redford, Flipping the Switch is part of The New Environmentalists, which illustrates how ordinary people are effecting extraordinary
change.

Greenland Melts

Dr. Konrad Steffen, the Swiss climate scientist whose research propelled Al Gore’s “An Inconvenient Truth” and “An Inconvenient
Sequel: Truth to Power”, reveals his alarming findings around glacial melt impacts on global sea level rise, climate change, and mass
migration. Greenland Melts is stunningly filmed at remote polar monitoring stations where Dr. Steffen has been tracking the melting of
the Greenlandic Ice Sheet for over 25 years.

RJ Ripper

Kids and bikes; wherever you are in the world, they go together. The chaotic streets of Kathmandu may not seem like a typical breeding
ground for world-class mountain bikers, but then again nothing is typical about Rajesh (RJ) Magar. Since learning to ride on a beat-up
clunker, to becoming the four-time National Champion at age 21, RJ’s story is one of boundless childhood dreaming and unstoppable
determination, forged from junkyard scraps and tested on the rugged trails of the mighty Himalaya.

For the Love of Mary

First-time 97-year-old runner, George Etzweiler, completed the race up the northeast’s tallest peak, Mount Washington, when he was
69 years old. Despite having a pacemaker, the State College, Pennsylvania resident competes in the grueling 7.6-mile race up nearly
4,700 feet of paved road, breaking his own record each year for the oldest finisher. In addition to his ancient, lucky, green running
shorts, Etzweiler carries something else special with him: The memory of his late wife of 68 years, Mary.

Chandalar

On a clear morning in Portland, Oregon, fourteen youth with oversized backpacks await a long day of travel. Along with five veterans, a
few volunteers and “Axe the Service Dog” they are headed to Fairbanks, Alaska. From there, they will pile into bush planes and fly into the Arctic Circle. This is Soul River, a non-profit organization founded by decorated Navy veteran Chad Brown. Their three-week
deployment to the Chandalar River is the culmination of outdoor conservation education, collective strengthening, leadership
development, healing, and a whole lot of fly fishing.

The Arrowhead Traverse

Maura and Bobby Marko are impassioned outdoor explorers. After becoming parents, they knew that passing on a love and respect for
the wilderness would be a major priority for their family. They attempted a bold traverse of the Arrowhead of Minnesota traveling from the Mississippi River to Lake Superior by bicycle, canoe, and foot; all with their 3-year-old son and 9-month-old daughter along for the
adventure.